The Power of Prevention

Continuing on from last week’s topic a little bit I’m going to hop up on my soap box for a brief moment and talk about something that is really important to me. We all know the worn out phrase, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” and probably all roll our eyes when someone says it. But I really want you to sit and think about what it means. It is not just something that our mothers say to us when we are being foolish and could hurt ourselves.

It means that the cure is more work than avoiding the condition, disease, or injury.

It means that prevention is far stronger than the cure.

It means that willpower is better than pain.

Prevention is what we call lifestyle therapy, which primarily means diet and exercise. At this point almost everyone is rolling their eyes again. Sure, you’ve heard it over and over that, “You should eat better and exercise more.” But the simple truth is that these two things can decrease out risk of chronic illness (and even some minor injuries) drastically.

Women who exercise regularly (even just walking) decrease their risk of developing breast cancer (1).

Adults who eat plenty of dietary Omega-3 fats daily decrease their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (sorry, no percentage available on this one) (2,3).

People who have fibre from cereal grains and fruits in their diet a reduced risk of developing colon cancer (4).

Regular exercise has been shown to reduce our risk of heart disease at any age (5,6,7).

These are just some of the statistics out there and there is so much more that research has shown us. However, we as a society have gotten ourselves into a rut and it is difficult to get out of it because that rut provides us with easy and cheap fast food and lots of activities and distractions that keep us too busy for exercise.

This path also lends itself to our collective fallacy of, “I don’t feel sick, therefore I am healthy.” We have to stop thinking this and remember that Health is NOT the absence of pain. Health is the optimal functioning of our bodies so that we may perform at our best at all times. Now, I’m not saying that we should all be Olympians. Optimal functioning means that we can meet the basic needs for survival and have plenty of energy and ability left over to rise to any challenge that is presented to us.

Most alternative medicines are based heavily in preventative care. Seeing a naturopath, massage therapist, or chiropractor on a regular basis can help to increase our ability to meet the challenges we face and decrease our risks of certain conditions and diseases even further.

So what is your plan for making your future the brightest it can be? I challenge you to go out and walk for 20 minutes, three days this week and take a look at your meals and make one thing on your plate healthier. Take that first step and see the difference it makes. Changing our habits and lifestyle is an uphill battle but it is far easier than dealing with the consequences of not doing it.

Thanks for reading,
Dr. Ben

References
1. Wu Y, Zhang D, and Kang S. Physical activity and risk of breast cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 2013;137(3):869-882

2. Dacks PA, Shineman DW, and Fillit HM. Current evidence for the clinical use of long-chain polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids to prevent age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease. The Journal of Nutrition, Health, and Aging 2013;17(3):240-251

3. Gillette-Guyonnet S, Secher M, and Vellas B. Nutrition and neurodegeneration: epidemiological evidence challenges for future research. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 2013;75(3):738-755

4. Murphy N, Norat T, Ferrari P, Jenab M, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Skeie G, Dahm CC, Overvad K, Olsen A, Tjønneland A, Clavel-Chapelon F, Boutron-Ruault MC, Racine A, Kaaks R, Teucher B, Boeing H, Bergmann MM, Trichopoulou A, Trichopoulos D, Lagiou P, Palli D, Pala V, Panico S, Tumino R, Vineis P, Siersema P, van Duijnhoven F, Peeters PH, Hjartaker A, Engeset D, González CA, Sánchez MJ, Dorronsoro M, Navarro C, Ardanaz E, Quirós JR, Sonestedt E, Ericson U, Nilsson L, Palmqvist R, Khaw KT, Wareham N, Key TJ, Crowe FL, Fedirko V, Wark PA, Chuang SC, and Riboli E. Dietary fibre intake and risks of cancers of the colon and rectum in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC). PLoS One 2012;7(6):e39361

5.Lamina S, Okoye CG, and Hanif SM. Randomised controlled trial: effects of aerobic exercise training programme on indices of adiposity and metabolic markers in hypertension. The Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association. 2013;63(6):680-687

6. Fakhry F, Rouwet EV, den Hoed PT, Hunink MG, and Spronk S. Long-term clinical effectiveness of supervised exercise therapy versus endovascular revascularization for intermittent claudication from a randomized clinical trial. The British Journal of Surgery. 2013;100(9):1164-1171

7. Back DT, Casey DP, Martin JS, Emerson BD, and Braith RW. Exercise training improves endothelial function in young prehypertensives. Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2013;238(4):433-441

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